Feb 07

Y Stage explores video gaming world

by Jenna Shummoogum · 0 comments

Post image for Y Stage explores video gaming world

In the online gaming world, a noob is someone who is new to the game and is unskilled. Not to be confused with a newb, noobs are not willing to learn new skills.

The world of online gaming is explored in Y Stage’s nOOb, performed and written by Christopher Duthie. The play tells of avid gamer Daniel, who runs away from home when his parents take away his Xbox. From its beginning in Sage Theatre’s Ignite! Festival, nOOb has found its way onto the big stage. The story is fuller, fleshed out and voices more questions that answers.


nOOb
explores Daniel’s world, how he begins to get more and more involved in the game and how he begins to ignore other aspects of his life. Told in voice overs, the audience gets a rare look into the thoughts of this young protagonist. From his intrigue of being within a glitch to how he doesn’t have to see someone face to know that they are friends. As he climbs around dodging bullets and plans the next strategic move, it is contrasted with how little his father understands about his gaming world. The game is teaching him how to be a better player and in the end ‘that’s the goal.’

Duthie makes seamless transition between Daniel and the father, crawling around, hiding in the crevasses of the video game of the set. Duthie is animated and compelling.

Deitra Kalyn decided to have the set as one piece that looks like something out of Tetris. It allows Duthie to jump from point to point and hide from unseen enemies.

nOOb is a full look into the short life of Brandon Crisp, the 15-year-old gamer ran away from home after his parents confiscated his Xbox and lost his life just outside of Barrie, Ontario. Running at 50 minutes, nOOb doesn’t ask all the questions around gaming and addiction that it could, but it is an insightful look at the world of gaming and it’s impact on both parents and youth.

nOOb only has two more runs (Friday and Saturday) at Y Stage at the Vertigo Theatre Centre. Tickets are available online.

Related Posts




Previous post:

Next post: